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The Seattle Seahawks are bringing back defensive end Authentic Bruce Irvin Jersey to help turn around one of the NFL’s least productive pass-rush units from last season, he told ESPN’s Josina Anderson.

Terms of Irvin’s deal, which was first reported by the NFL Network, were not immediately known.

Irvin, 32, tweeted his excitement about returning to the team that drafted him 15th overall in 2012.

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The Seahawks also are adding more offensive-line help by agreeing to deals with tackles Authentic Brandon Shell Jersey and Authentic Cedric Ogbuehi Jersey, according to ESPN’s Adam Schefter and Jordan Schultz.

Shell’s deal is for two years and $11 million, a source told Schefter. The 28-year-old Shell, a fifth-round pick in 2016, started 40 games in four seasons with the New York Jets and 37 over the past three years. His addition lessens the chances of the Seahawks re-signing right tackle Germain Ifedi.

Ogbuehi, 27, was a first-round pick by the Cincinnati Bengals in 2015 and spent last season with the Jacksonville Jaguars. He’s made 25 career starts but none in the past two seasons. His deal is for one year and has a max value of $3.3 million, a source told Schultz.

With Seattle signing Shell, the Seahawks and Jets effectively swapped tackles with New York signing George Fant to a three-year, $27.3 million deal.

Ifedi is one of two remaining free agents on the Seahawks’ offensive line along with left guard Mike Iupati. Seattle added a potential Iupati replacement on Tuesday in ex-Steeler B.J. Finney on a two-year, $8 million deal.

Irvin signed a one-year, $4 million deal with the Carolina Panthers last season to help then-coach Ron Rivera in his switch from a 4-3 to a 3-4 defense. His “dog mentality” brought a needed toughness to the Panthers’ defense early last season before injuries to key players took a toll.

Irvin recorded a career-best 8.5 sacks for Carolina in 13 games after missing the first three with a hamstring injury. No Seahawks defender had more than four sacks in 2019 as the team finished the regular season with only 28, tied for the second-fewest in the NFL.

The Seahawks have re-signed Authentic Jarran Reed Jersey and are trying to re-sign Jadeveon Clowney, who was their most disruptive defensive lineman last season. Seattle lost another defensive lineman, Quinton Jefferson, to the Buffalo Bills. Al Woods and Ezekiel Ansah are free agents.

Irvin won a title in the first of his two trips to the Super Bowl with Seattle and then signed as a free agent with the Oakland Raiders in 2016, after Seattle declined the fifth-year option on his rookie contract. He split time with Oakland and the Atlanta Falcons in 2018 before signing with Carolina in 2019.

Irvin has 52 career sacks, 301 tackles, 16 forced fumbles (3 recoveries) and 3 interceptions in eight NFL seasons. He also has two touchdowns.

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RENTON, Wash. — DK Metcalf was impossible to miss during the Seattle Seahawks’ offseason program.

Of the 10 practices between rookie minicamp, organized team activities and veteran minicamp that were open to reporters, not one went by without Metcalf making a head-turning play or two. He beat defenders off the line of scrimmage, and he made outstretched catches in traffic over the middle and leaping ones down the sideline. He got lots of work with quarterback Russell Wilson and the No. 1 offense.

All while wearing a hooded sweatshirt that obscured his massive biceps.

DK Metcalf came into his pre-draft interview with Seattle with his shirt off after a scout talked him into it.

Pete Carroll was shocked so he took his off too

(via @Seahawks) pic.twitter.com/7dwBavQGhS

— ESPN (@espn) April 27, 2019
Leading up to and immediately after the NFL draft, in which the Seahawks traded up to take Metcalf with the final pick of the second round, he was perhaps known just as much for his hulking physique as he was for what he did on the field at Ole Miss.

But this spring, he was more than merely a physical specimen. Wilson pointed to Metcalf’s football knowledge when asked what about the rookie wide receiver has stood out most.

“Everybody knows about his ability to run and everything else, and jump and catch and all that,” Wilson said. “You guys have been talking about that for months, but I think more than anything else, it’s his brain and how he processes information and how quickly he understands it. He’s really intelligent. He really understands the game really well. He takes coaching really well. He gets extra work. He’s a legit pro wide receiver. He’s everything that everybody was talking about in terms of what he’s capable of and more.”

Metcalf, at 6-foot-3 and 228 pounds, has looked like a professional receiver during offseason work, so much so that it was easy to momentarily forget about all the concerns over his route running, lateral agility and NFL readiness. Metcalf ran a blazing 4.33 seconds in the 40-yard dash at the combine but produced less impressive results in some of the agility drills. He managed 26 catches for 569 yards and five touchdowns before a neck injury ended his final season at Ole Miss after only seven games.

“Very natural player,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. “He hasn’t had any trouble doing anything we’re doing. He looks like he’s done it before. He’s got to get more disciplined. He’s got splits and all kinds of things, rules that he’s got to get right, but the physical things that [receivers coach Nate Carroll is] asking him to do, he can do it. He can do it. The route changes that we’re doing, the adjustments, his body control. He’s really been a marvelous competitor in this camp. We’ve seen plays out of him every day that look special, and most of it comes out of, one, his speed, but the other is his catching range and the ability to get out away from his body and get up off his feet and make really special catches.

“So we don’t see any hindrance, restriction at all. He’s in here competing to play.”
The NFL gushed over DK Metcalf’s physique in the draft buildup, but so far it’s his ability to pick up the offense that has impressed Russell Wilson & Co. Joseph Weiser/Icon Sportswire
Now, for the mandatory pumping of the breaks. The usual caveats about offseason practices apply here. The noncontact format — Seahawks defensive backs weren’t fully contesting catches — sets pass-catchers up to shine. And there are a few cautionary tales from recent Seahawks past about getting too excited over an impressive spring from a rookie receiver.

In 2010, it was Golden Tate, who arrived with similar fanfare as a second-round pick coming off an All-American season that earned him the Biletnikoff Award as the nation’s top receiver. He made play after play over the spring and summer and looked poised for a strong rookie season. He was benched in Week 1 and finished the year with only 21 catches.

Carroll has theorized aloud that Tate’s football development was stunted in college because of the double duty he pulled as an outfielder on Notre Dame’s baseball team, which took him away from spring practices. Tate readily admitted years after the fact that he was skating by on his athleticism as a rookie and didn’t really understand the finer points of the position.

As for Metcalf?

“I think he’s way above what people from the outside probably expected him to be,” said Tyler Lockett, Seattle’s No. 1 receiver. “The way that he does a lot of his releases, he changes it up every single day. You’re going against the defense where people know, OK, if he does this, he does this every single day, I know how to be able to approach it. But some days he changes up the way that he approaches his aggressiveness. Sometimes he’s aggressive, sometimes he slows it up, sometimes he uses his hands, two days later he doesn’t use his hands and people are off guard when it comes to being able to guard him.”

Metcalf was the first player Wilson mentioned when asked about the new-look receiver corps, which includes three draft picks (Seattle also chose Gary Jennings in the fourth round and John Ursua in the seventh) and no more Doug Baldwin.

“It’s great seeing DK make his plays,” Wilson said. “I think DK is looking really, really special. He can do anything and everything, and he’s tremendous.”

Public praise from the uber-positive Wilson is not hard to come by. But trust is. Wilson is so protective of the football, so wired to avoid turnovers, that he’s not going to throw to a receiver who hasn’t earned his trust. It is thus telling how regularly he went to Metcalf during offseason practices. Metcalf made a strong impression on his quarterback on the field and behind the scenes.

“I could kind of tell as soon as he got drafted,” Wilson said. “We talked on the phone as soon as that happened. We talked for about 15-20 minutes just about where he wanted to go and everything else. I could tell. You could sense it … you kind of can tell the guys that are really hunting for something special, and I think he is.”

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Russell Wilson without his top target and toughest critic. Story

• Why Tyler Lockett wants to be ‘uncomfortable’

Offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer didn’t care to set any expectations for Metcalf’s rookie season. It’s June, after all. Training camp and the preseason will offer a better gauge of where Metcalf and veterans David Moore and Jaron Brown stand in the pecking order behind Lockett. Metcalf has a leg up on Jennings and Ursua, both of whom missed time with hamstring injuries, as well as fellow rookies Jazz Ferguson and Terry Wright.
“It’s too early to say that,” Schottenheimer said. “Just continue to develop. Continue to work. I think the sky’s the limit with the potential. I love his work ethic. He’s a terrific worker. Whether he’s catching tennis balls on the Jugs I see sometimes, I see balls flying around. So I think, again, a lot of it is going to be the timing he gets with Russ, but I’m very pleased with what we see right now.”

Carroll was asked how much it has helped Metcalf’s football development to have a father who played in the NFL. Terrence Metcalf was a guard for the Bears from 2002 to 2008.

“There’s something to that,” Carroll said. “Guys, lots of times, they gain a savvy just from sitting at the dinner table. It happens. … We’re just going to go and see how far we can go with him and see how much he can earn his playing time.”

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A breakdown of the Seattle Seahawks’ 2019 free-agent signings.

Akeem King, defensive back

The Seahawks re-signed Akeem King to a one-year deal worth $1.4 million on Friday, a source tells ESPN. Here’s a closer look at the defensive back who spent the past two seasons with Seattle.

What it means: Bringing back King is the first move by the Seahawks and it’s a notable one even though he’s an under-the-radar player. In addition to playing left and right cornerback, King has worked in the slot and at safety — a la DeShawn Shead. That versatility could come in handy given the state of Seattle’s secondary, which is about to say goodbye to Earl Thomas and also could lose nickelback Justin Coleman in free agency. King, a seventh-round pick by the Falcons in 2015, appeared in all 16 games last season while making one start and playing 145 defensive snaps, per Pro Football Reference. King, who will be 27 by the start of next season, was one of Seattle’s four restricted free agents along with tackle/tight end George Fant, defensive lineman Quinton Jefferson and fullback Tre Madden.

2019 Free Agency | Seahawks
What you need to know about the Seattle Seahawks:

» Seahawks’ free-agent signings
» Team needs: DL, LB, DB, EDGE
» Tracker: Latest moves around NFL
» Full top 100 free-agent rankingInsider
What’s the risk: There’s not much risk here. King’s one-year deal includes a $400,000 signing bonus, according to a source. He can make up to $2.05 million in all with incentives tied to playing time and interceptions. The max value of $2.05 million is slightly more than what King would have stood to make had the Seahawks given him the low RFA tender, which is worth a non-guaranteed $2.025 million. But if he makes the full amount, it means he became a significant contributor. And if not, the Seahawks will have paid him less than what they would have with the low tender. King is guaranteed more money on his deal than he would have been guaranteed on the tender. There’s more reward than risk for both sides.

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Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin has a Grade 2 partial MCL tear of the right knee, a source told ESPN’s Adam Schefter.

Baldwin went down in the first quarter of Seattle’s 27-24 loss against the Denver Broncos on Sunday and started limping off the field before he went down again and had to be tended to by the team’s medical staff. He eventually walked off on his own power and returned later in the first half, but was on the sideline in street clothes after halftime. Baldwin did not have a reception.

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Earl Thomas comes up big in Seahawks return
Safety Earl Thomas needed all of three practices and two defensive possessions to remind the Seahawks what they were missing, recording an interception and pass-breakup in the first quarter of Seattle’s loss to Denver on Sunday.

Coach Pete Carroll said on his radio show on KIRO-AM in Seattle on Monday that there was no update on how long Baldwin may be out.

“He was sore last night, but he was walking OK and all that,” Carroll said. “He wasn’t hampered in that regard. But he got hurt. He got hurt. There ain’t anybody tougher than him, and if he can come back, he’ll come back. That’s why he went back in the game. We were trying to talk him out of it and getting him to get him out of there. He made the right decision in not battling us.”

Baldwin, who has led Seattle in receiving in five of his seven NFL seasons, missed about a month of training camp with a left-knee injury. He estimated when he returned to practice in late August that he was 80 to 85 percent healthy and said his knee injury was something he would have to deal with throughout the season.

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RENTON, Wash. — If you’re a Seattle Seahawks tight end, you’d better not let anyone catch you reliving your high school glory days.

Or wearing your college team’s gear.

Or flaunting an expensive new purchase.

Those are just a few of the fineable offenses in the position group’s kangaroo court, a tradition that third-year tight end Nick Vannett is upholding following the free-agent departures of Jimmy Graham and Luke Willson. Vannett isn’t sure exactly when it started, just that it predates his arrival as a third-round pick in 2016 out of Ohio State.

“I’d say the most common one is probably a ‘Homeland’ fine,” Vannett said. “That’s the one we probably dish out the most. So for me, for example, if I were to wear anything Ohio, Ohio State, if I mention Ohio, any city in Ohio, I get fined for that.”

‘THAT’S A FINE’

A few examples of the fines doled out among the Seahawks’ tight ends, courtesy Nick Vannett:

Big Baller fine: “If you make like a big purchase or if you’re acting like you’re just a big baller, walking around like your s— don’t stink, then yeah [it’s a fine].”

Homeland fine: “That’s the one we probably dish out the most. So for me, for example, if I were to wear anything Ohio, Ohio State, if I mention Ohio, any city in Ohio, I get fined for that.”

Uncle Rico fine: “If you tell a high school story that we all just really don’t care about, that’s a fine.”

Sound effects fine: Vannett didn’t have much explanation other than to say their TE coach is a frequent violator.

No-fine fine: “If you go the whole day without getting a fine, you’re getting a fine.”

It’s $20 a pop — at least for now — with half the final pot helping fund an end-of-season tight ends trip and the other half earmarked for a to-be-determined charity. (“It usually goes towards something kid-related. In the past, we did it for cancer. So it’s always going towards a good cause,” Vannett said.)

It’s a good thing, then, that the fines are doled out liberally and no one in the room is above the law. Not even tight ends coach Pat McPherson.

“For Coach Pat, his big one is sound effects,” Vannett said. “He’s always making these sound effects like when we’re watching film. So 90 percent of his fines are from sound effects. We’ve got ‘Uncle Rico’ fines where if you tell a high school story that we all just really don’t care about, that’s a fine. There’s so many. We have a ‘No Fine’ fine. If you go the whole day without getting a fine, you’re getting a fine.”

The “Uncle Rico” fine is named for the character from “Napoleon Dynamite” who famously bragged that he could throw a pigskin a quarter mile back in his day and lamented that his high school team would’ve won state if only his coach had played him in the fourth quarter.

Said Vannett of McPherson: “We’ll watch film and something will click in his head and he’s like, ‘Oh, man, I remember this time at UCLA’ or whatever school he went to, like, ‘I did this in practice.’

“It’s like, ‘Pat, appreciate the story but that’s an Uncle Rico.'”

The tight ends aren’t the team’s only position group that has a fine system, but this one is definitely the wackiest.

“They’re kinda crazy,” said Frank Clark, who added that the defensive linemen will fine each other $500 whenever one of them costs another a sack.

Keeping things light is nothing new for Seattle’s tight ends. It was that group — Willson specifically — that spearheaded the Techno Thursday movement that by last season’s end had players bouncing up and down and pumping their fists while electronic dance music blared through the speakers in the locker room and the practice field.

It was a surprise when Vannett & Co. didn’t re-enact their club routine after he scored the Seahawks’ only offensive touchdown in their preseason opener.

It was a Thursday night, after all.

“Techno Thursday hasn’t really been the way I want it to be yet,” he said. “But … it’s still preseason, so we don’t want to show everything right now.”

After catching only 15 passes over his first two seasons while playing behind Graham and Willson, Vannett is in line for a larger role in 2018. He’s apparently over a nagging disc issue in his back that had plagued him, and he started Seattle’s first two preseason games while routinely working with the No. 1 offense along with rookie Will Dissly because veteran Ed Dickson has been on the non-football injury list.

Dickson, a free-agent addition from Carolina, is the oldest of Seattle’s five tight ends at 31. But Vannett is the longest tenured in Seattle, and as such, he’s taken over for Willson as the overseer of the fines. That means he has the ultimate authority on what constitutes a fine, though he says he sometimes defers when he’s on the fence.
And it also means Vannett is in charge of keeping the running tally of who owes what. He estimates that he’s already in for around $2,000, which puts him in the middle of the pack, and that Dissly has contributed around $2,700 to top the list since the start of the offseason program in April.

Dissly’s total was inflated thanks to a hefty initiation fine.

Yep, a fine for getting drafted.

“When he first came in, since he was a fourth-round pick he got some signing bonus [$650,268 to be exact], and it happened to me when I first came in. We gave him a $1,000 initiation fine,” Vannett said. “So whenever somebody new comes in the room, you get an initiation fine, and depending on what your contract was [that determines the fine amount].”

What was Dissly’s reaction?

“He was kinda smiling it off,” Vannett said. “He didn’t know what to do. I mean, what can you do? If you complain about it, it’s another fine.”

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The Seattle Seahawks have already announced the firings of their top four assistant coaches, including their two coordinators, plus a mutual parting of ways with a fifth. A few others are not expected to return as a result of the biggest overhaul of Pete Carroll’s staff since he took over as head coach in 2010.

A similarly drastic retooling of the roster could follow in the wake of a 9-7 finish that snapped Seattle’s string of five straight playoff appearances. That’s the belief among some observers and at least a few of the players themselves.

“I definitely think there’s going to be some player changes,” defensive lineman Michael Bennett recently told Sports Radio 950 KJR in Seattle.
Michael Bennett believes big-name player changes are coming in Seattle — changes that could include the defensive lineman himself. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
There are always changes to a team’s roster from one year to the next, but Bennett was talking about big changes involving big-name players.

“Earl Thomas has one year on his contract, Richard Sherman’s coming off the injury,” Bennett said. “You just never know.”

In response to Bennett on the possibility of a significant roster shake-up, tight end Luke Willson told the same station, “I would agree. Hopefully I’m not part of that turnover. I guess we’ll find out soon.”

Willson is one of 16 Seahawks scheduled to become unrestricted free agents. That group also includes tight end Jimmy Graham, defensive tackle Sheldon Richardson and wide receiver Paul Richardson, among other starters. We’ll examine their situations in the coming weeks as free agency draws nearer.

We’ve recently looked at the situations with strong safety Kam Chancellor and defensive end Cliff Avril, whose football futures are in jeopardy because of neck injuries.

Here is a look at three other longtime Seahawks who are under contract but may not be back in 2018 for reasons including age, health, salary and/or other contractual dynamics. Like Chancellor and Avril, they’ve been key members of a Seahawks defense that allowed the fewest points in the NFL from 2012 to 2015 but slipped to third and then a tie for 13th over the past two seasons.

FS Earl Thomas

Age: Turns 29 in May

Contract status: Entering the final year of a four-year, $40 million extension

Recent comments from Thomas to ESPN set the stage for a potential holdout in the absence of a multiyear extension at his desired price. We can safely assume that price at least matches, if not tops, the $13 million average of Eric Berry’s latest deal with the Kansas City Chiefs, which he signed last offseason to become the NFL’s highest-paid safety. Thomas, coming off his sixth Pro Bowl appearance and arguably the most important player to Seattle’s defense, would be well within reason to ask for that type of compensation. The Seahawks would be well within reason to balk given the inherent risk of making that large of a financial commitment to a player who is approaching 30 and has missed seven games over the past two seasons because of three injuries. An impasse could lead the Seahawks to shop Thomas in trade talks like they did under much different circumstances with Sherman last offseason. Thomas is a once-in-a-generation player, but if he digs his heels in and if another team makes Seattle a worthwhile offer, pulling the trigger on a trade wouldn’t be out of the question even if it wouldn’t make the Seahawks better right away.

CB Richard Sherman

Age: Turns 30 in March

Contract status: Entering the final year of a four-year, $56 million extension

Sherman, like Thomas, is one of the most iconic players in franchise history. He was again playing at an All-Pro level when his season ended in November because of a ruptured Achilles. He has a good chance at being ready by the start of next season based on the typical recovery period for that injury. It should be noted that he appeared to hit the reset button during an incident-free season after a tumultuous 2016 that included a pair of sideline blowups toward coaches. All of that could work in favor of Seattle bringing Sherman back in 2018, especially because his injury figures to severely diminish his trade value. On the other hand, there are no guarantees with injuries as significant as Sherman’s. He also carries a 2018 salary-cap charge of $13.2 million with only $2.2 million in dead money, meaning the Seahawks could save a whopping $11 million if they were to cut him. They could wait to make any decision on Sherman until after free agency and the draft, which would allow them to assess their cornerback situation and Sherman’s health first.

DL Michael Bennett

Age: Turns 33 in November

Contract status: Signed through 2020 on a three-year, $30.5 million extension
It was only 14 months ago that Seattle gave Bennett a new contract that came with a raise he had been seeking since 2015, but the possibility of the Seahawks releasing him seems real despite that. He even acknowledged as much at season’s end, telling The News Tribune that he “probably won’t be back next year.” It’s not as though Bennett’s 2017 season was a disappointment. Yes, he continued to struggle with penalties, as did the Seahawks as a team. But Bennett remained a disruptive force when he wasn’t jumping offside. He finished second on the team with 8.5 sacks and again led Seattle’s defensive linemen in snaps — by a wide margin — despite playing with foot and knee injuries.

The Seahawks would incur a little over $5.2 million in dead-money charges by releasing Bennett because it’s so early in his extension. The cap savings would be just under $2.2 million, which is not much. That coupled with the strong possibility that Avril won’t be able to play again — or is released before that determination is made — could lead the Seahawks to give Bennett another season. It’s also conceivable that they bite the salary-cap bullet and move on from Bennett now with an eye toward avoiding the possibility of his age and further injury leading to a rapid decline in his effectiveness. If the Seahawks do release Bennett, expect it to happen before he’s owed a $3 million roster bonus in March.