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Authentic Chance Warmack Jersey 2020 online

The Seahawks added more offensive line depth Monday, signing guard Authentic Chance Warmack Jersey, a former first-round pick out of Alabama.

Warmack, 28, was the 10th overall pick in the 2013 draft by the Tennessee Titans after a college career in which he was a three-year starter for the Crimson Tide, earning unanimous All-American honors as a senior as part of a repeat national championship team. Warmack was teammates at Alabama with Seahawks guard Authentic D.J. Fluker Jersey, who was taken one pick after Warmack in the 2013 draft.

Warmack was Tennessee’s starting right guard in his first three seasons, starting 46 games from 2013-2015, but played only two games in 2016 before landing on injured reserve with a hand injury. Warmack spent 2017 and 2018 in Philadelphia, where he won a Super Bowl, serving mostly as a reserve lineman, starting three games and appearing in 20. Warmack was out of football last season, but will look to make a successful comeback with Seattle in 2020.

Warmack is the fourth offensive lineman added by Seattle early in free agency after center B.J. Finney and tackles Brandon Shell and Cedric Ogbuehi.

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The Seattle Seahawks won’t kick off the 2020 NFL season for another six months, and the team’s offseason program doesn’t begin until April. But Seahawks guard Authentic D.J. Fluker Jersey is working to be ready even in the first week of March.

Fluker shared a part of his workout regimen on Friday – pulling a truck.

DJ Fluker TheWarrior

@DJTheWarrior76
Actions speak louder than words…

cc: @hoptraining

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Fluker is listed on the Seahawks’ roster as 6-foot-5 and 342 pounds.

Fluker has shared other parts of his fitness program this offseason, too.

DJ Fluker TheWarrior

@DJTheWarrior76
Push, push, push, push… Man, today’s workout had me wishing it was someone across from me instead of just weights. All this hard work against air got me feeling some kind of way.

How many days until the first @Seahawks game?

Y’all counting down too, [email protected]

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DJ Fluker TheWarrior

@DJTheWarrior76
Work now, reap the benefits during the reason.

Hawaii is just what I needed.

Stay tuned, folks. @hoptraining y’all treating me right.

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Fluker started 14 regular-season and two playoff games at right guard for the Seahawks in 2019, missing two October games with a hamstring injury. He’s preparing for his third season with Seattle.

Fluker entered the NFL as the 11th player picked in the 2013 NFL Draft. He played right offensive tackle in his first two seasons and right guard in the next two with the San Diego Chargers.

Fluker had started all 59 of the games that he played for the Chargers and was supposed to be with the team in 2017 after it picked up its fifth-year option on his rookie contract in 2016. But the Chargers decided the option price for Fluker — $8,821,000 — was too high, and they released him two days before his 2017 salary would have become guaranteed.

Four days later, Fluker signed a one-year, $3 million contract with the New York Giants.

Fluker played in seven games with the Giants in 2017 before turf toe cut short his season, sending him into free agency again.

In 2018, Fluker signed a one-year, $1.5 million contract with the Seahawks. He helped transform Seattle from one of the worst rushing teams in the NFL in 2017 to the best in 2018 with his work at right guard. Injuries caused Fluker to miss six games, and Seattle had an 8-2 record with him the lineup and a 2-4 mark without him during the regular season.

Fluker stayed with Seattle by signing a two-year, $6 million contract last offseason.

After Hurricane Katrina destroyed the home of Fluker’s family in New Orleans, he prepped at McGill-Toolen in Mobile and Foley before playing for Alabama, where he was the starting right offensive tackle for the Crimson Tide’s 2011 and 2012 BCS national-championship teams.

Cheap Authentic Nike Custom Seattle Seahawks Jerseys 2019

RENTON, Wash. — DK Metcalf was impossible to miss during the Seattle Seahawks’ offseason program.

Of the 10 practices between rookie minicamp, organized team activities and veteran minicamp that were open to reporters, not one went by without Metcalf making a head-turning play or two. He beat defenders off the line of scrimmage, and he made outstretched catches in traffic over the middle and leaping ones down the sideline. He got lots of work with quarterback Russell Wilson and the No. 1 offense.

All while wearing a hooded sweatshirt that obscured his massive biceps.

DK Metcalf came into his pre-draft interview with Seattle with his shirt off after a scout talked him into it.

Pete Carroll was shocked so he took his off too

(via @Seahawks) pic.twitter.com/7dwBavQGhS

— ESPN (@espn) April 27, 2019
Leading up to and immediately after the NFL draft, in which the Seahawks traded up to take Metcalf with the final pick of the second round, he was perhaps known just as much for his hulking physique as he was for what he did on the field at Ole Miss.

But this spring, he was more than merely a physical specimen. Wilson pointed to Metcalf’s football knowledge when asked what about the rookie wide receiver has stood out most.

“Everybody knows about his ability to run and everything else, and jump and catch and all that,” Wilson said. “You guys have been talking about that for months, but I think more than anything else, it’s his brain and how he processes information and how quickly he understands it. He’s really intelligent. He really understands the game really well. He takes coaching really well. He gets extra work. He’s a legit pro wide receiver. He’s everything that everybody was talking about in terms of what he’s capable of and more.”

Metcalf, at 6-foot-3 and 228 pounds, has looked like a professional receiver during offseason work, so much so that it was easy to momentarily forget about all the concerns over his route running, lateral agility and NFL readiness. Metcalf ran a blazing 4.33 seconds in the 40-yard dash at the combine but produced less impressive results in some of the agility drills. He managed 26 catches for 569 yards and five touchdowns before a neck injury ended his final season at Ole Miss after only seven games.

“Very natural player,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. “He hasn’t had any trouble doing anything we’re doing. He looks like he’s done it before. He’s got to get more disciplined. He’s got splits and all kinds of things, rules that he’s got to get right, but the physical things that [receivers coach Nate Carroll is] asking him to do, he can do it. He can do it. The route changes that we’re doing, the adjustments, his body control. He’s really been a marvelous competitor in this camp. We’ve seen plays out of him every day that look special, and most of it comes out of, one, his speed, but the other is his catching range and the ability to get out away from his body and get up off his feet and make really special catches.

“So we don’t see any hindrance, restriction at all. He’s in here competing to play.”
The NFL gushed over DK Metcalf’s physique in the draft buildup, but so far it’s his ability to pick up the offense that has impressed Russell Wilson & Co. Joseph Weiser/Icon Sportswire
Now, for the mandatory pumping of the breaks. The usual caveats about offseason practices apply here. The noncontact format — Seahawks defensive backs weren’t fully contesting catches — sets pass-catchers up to shine. And there are a few cautionary tales from recent Seahawks past about getting too excited over an impressive spring from a rookie receiver.

In 2010, it was Golden Tate, who arrived with similar fanfare as a second-round pick coming off an All-American season that earned him the Biletnikoff Award as the nation’s top receiver. He made play after play over the spring and summer and looked poised for a strong rookie season. He was benched in Week 1 and finished the year with only 21 catches.

Carroll has theorized aloud that Tate’s football development was stunted in college because of the double duty he pulled as an outfielder on Notre Dame’s baseball team, which took him away from spring practices. Tate readily admitted years after the fact that he was skating by on his athleticism as a rookie and didn’t really understand the finer points of the position.

As for Metcalf?

“I think he’s way above what people from the outside probably expected him to be,” said Tyler Lockett, Seattle’s No. 1 receiver. “The way that he does a lot of his releases, he changes it up every single day. You’re going against the defense where people know, OK, if he does this, he does this every single day, I know how to be able to approach it. But some days he changes up the way that he approaches his aggressiveness. Sometimes he’s aggressive, sometimes he slows it up, sometimes he uses his hands, two days later he doesn’t use his hands and people are off guard when it comes to being able to guard him.”

Metcalf was the first player Wilson mentioned when asked about the new-look receiver corps, which includes three draft picks (Seattle also chose Gary Jennings in the fourth round and John Ursua in the seventh) and no more Doug Baldwin.

“It’s great seeing DK make his plays,” Wilson said. “I think DK is looking really, really special. He can do anything and everything, and he’s tremendous.”

Public praise from the uber-positive Wilson is not hard to come by. But trust is. Wilson is so protective of the football, so wired to avoid turnovers, that he’s not going to throw to a receiver who hasn’t earned his trust. It is thus telling how regularly he went to Metcalf during offseason practices. Metcalf made a strong impression on his quarterback on the field and behind the scenes.

“I could kind of tell as soon as he got drafted,” Wilson said. “We talked on the phone as soon as that happened. We talked for about 15-20 minutes just about where he wanted to go and everything else. I could tell. You could sense it … you kind of can tell the guys that are really hunting for something special, and I think he is.”

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• Why Tyler Lockett wants to be ‘uncomfortable’

Offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer didn’t care to set any expectations for Metcalf’s rookie season. It’s June, after all. Training camp and the preseason will offer a better gauge of where Metcalf and veterans David Moore and Jaron Brown stand in the pecking order behind Lockett. Metcalf has a leg up on Jennings and Ursua, both of whom missed time with hamstring injuries, as well as fellow rookies Jazz Ferguson and Terry Wright.
“It’s too early to say that,” Schottenheimer said. “Just continue to develop. Continue to work. I think the sky’s the limit with the potential. I love his work ethic. He’s a terrific worker. Whether he’s catching tennis balls on the Jugs I see sometimes, I see balls flying around. So I think, again, a lot of it is going to be the timing he gets with Russ, but I’m very pleased with what we see right now.”

Carroll was asked how much it has helped Metcalf’s football development to have a father who played in the NFL. Terrence Metcalf was a guard for the Bears from 2002 to 2008.

“There’s something to that,” Carroll said. “Guys, lots of times, they gain a savvy just from sitting at the dinner table. It happens. … We’re just going to go and see how far we can go with him and see how much he can earn his playing time.”

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A breakdown of the Seattle Seahawks’ 2019 free-agent signings.

Akeem King, defensive back

The Seahawks re-signed Akeem King to a one-year deal worth $1.4 million on Friday, a source tells ESPN. Here’s a closer look at the defensive back who spent the past two seasons with Seattle.

What it means: Bringing back King is the first move by the Seahawks and it’s a notable one even though he’s an under-the-radar player. In addition to playing left and right cornerback, King has worked in the slot and at safety — a la DeShawn Shead. That versatility could come in handy given the state of Seattle’s secondary, which is about to say goodbye to Earl Thomas and also could lose nickelback Justin Coleman in free agency. King, a seventh-round pick by the Falcons in 2015, appeared in all 16 games last season while making one start and playing 145 defensive snaps, per Pro Football Reference. King, who will be 27 by the start of next season, was one of Seattle’s four restricted free agents along with tackle/tight end George Fant, defensive lineman Quinton Jefferson and fullback Tre Madden.

2019 Free Agency | Seahawks
What you need to know about the Seattle Seahawks:

» Seahawks’ free-agent signings
» Team needs: DL, LB, DB, EDGE
» Tracker: Latest moves around NFL
» Full top 100 free-agent rankingInsider
What’s the risk: There’s not much risk here. King’s one-year deal includes a $400,000 signing bonus, according to a source. He can make up to $2.05 million in all with incentives tied to playing time and interceptions. The max value of $2.05 million is slightly more than what King would have stood to make had the Seahawks given him the low RFA tender, which is worth a non-guaranteed $2.025 million. But if he makes the full amount, it means he became a significant contributor. And if not, the Seahawks will have paid him less than what they would have with the low tender. King is guaranteed more money on his deal than he would have been guaranteed on the tender. There’s more reward than risk for both sides.

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Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin has a Grade 2 partial MCL tear of the right knee, a source told ESPN’s Adam Schefter.

Baldwin went down in the first quarter of Seattle’s 27-24 loss against the Denver Broncos on Sunday and started limping off the field before he went down again and had to be tended to by the team’s medical staff. He eventually walked off on his own power and returned later in the first half, but was on the sideline in street clothes after halftime. Baldwin did not have a reception.

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Earl Thomas comes up big in Seahawks return
Safety Earl Thomas needed all of three practices and two defensive possessions to remind the Seahawks what they were missing, recording an interception and pass-breakup in the first quarter of Seattle’s loss to Denver on Sunday.

Coach Pete Carroll said on his radio show on KIRO-AM in Seattle on Monday that there was no update on how long Baldwin may be out.

“He was sore last night, but he was walking OK and all that,” Carroll said. “He wasn’t hampered in that regard. But he got hurt. He got hurt. There ain’t anybody tougher than him, and if he can come back, he’ll come back. That’s why he went back in the game. We were trying to talk him out of it and getting him to get him out of there. He made the right decision in not battling us.”

Baldwin, who has led Seattle in receiving in five of his seven NFL seasons, missed about a month of training camp with a left-knee injury. He estimated when he returned to practice in late August that he was 80 to 85 percent healthy and said his knee injury was something he would have to deal with throughout the season.

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RENTON, Wash. — If you’re a Seattle Seahawks tight end, you’d better not let anyone catch you reliving your high school glory days.

Or wearing your college team’s gear.

Or flaunting an expensive new purchase.

Those are just a few of the fineable offenses in the position group’s kangaroo court, a tradition that third-year tight end Nick Vannett is upholding following the free-agent departures of Jimmy Graham and Luke Willson. Vannett isn’t sure exactly when it started, just that it predates his arrival as a third-round pick in 2016 out of Ohio State.

“I’d say the most common one is probably a ‘Homeland’ fine,” Vannett said. “That’s the one we probably dish out the most. So for me, for example, if I were to wear anything Ohio, Ohio State, if I mention Ohio, any city in Ohio, I get fined for that.”

‘THAT’S A FINE’

A few examples of the fines doled out among the Seahawks’ tight ends, courtesy Nick Vannett:

Big Baller fine: “If you make like a big purchase or if you’re acting like you’re just a big baller, walking around like your s— don’t stink, then yeah [it’s a fine].”

Homeland fine: “That’s the one we probably dish out the most. So for me, for example, if I were to wear anything Ohio, Ohio State, if I mention Ohio, any city in Ohio, I get fined for that.”

Uncle Rico fine: “If you tell a high school story that we all just really don’t care about, that’s a fine.”

Sound effects fine: Vannett didn’t have much explanation other than to say their TE coach is a frequent violator.

No-fine fine: “If you go the whole day without getting a fine, you’re getting a fine.”

It’s $20 a pop — at least for now — with half the final pot helping fund an end-of-season tight ends trip and the other half earmarked for a to-be-determined charity. (“It usually goes towards something kid-related. In the past, we did it for cancer. So it’s always going towards a good cause,” Vannett said.)

It’s a good thing, then, that the fines are doled out liberally and no one in the room is above the law. Not even tight ends coach Pat McPherson.

“For Coach Pat, his big one is sound effects,” Vannett said. “He’s always making these sound effects like when we’re watching film. So 90 percent of his fines are from sound effects. We’ve got ‘Uncle Rico’ fines where if you tell a high school story that we all just really don’t care about, that’s a fine. There’s so many. We have a ‘No Fine’ fine. If you go the whole day without getting a fine, you’re getting a fine.”

The “Uncle Rico” fine is named for the character from “Napoleon Dynamite” who famously bragged that he could throw a pigskin a quarter mile back in his day and lamented that his high school team would’ve won state if only his coach had played him in the fourth quarter.

Said Vannett of McPherson: “We’ll watch film and something will click in his head and he’s like, ‘Oh, man, I remember this time at UCLA’ or whatever school he went to, like, ‘I did this in practice.’

“It’s like, ‘Pat, appreciate the story but that’s an Uncle Rico.'”

The tight ends aren’t the team’s only position group that has a fine system, but this one is definitely the wackiest.

“They’re kinda crazy,” said Frank Clark, who added that the defensive linemen will fine each other $500 whenever one of them costs another a sack.

Keeping things light is nothing new for Seattle’s tight ends. It was that group — Willson specifically — that spearheaded the Techno Thursday movement that by last season’s end had players bouncing up and down and pumping their fists while electronic dance music blared through the speakers in the locker room and the practice field.

It was a surprise when Vannett & Co. didn’t re-enact their club routine after he scored the Seahawks’ only offensive touchdown in their preseason opener.

It was a Thursday night, after all.

“Techno Thursday hasn’t really been the way I want it to be yet,” he said. “But … it’s still preseason, so we don’t want to show everything right now.”

After catching only 15 passes over his first two seasons while playing behind Graham and Willson, Vannett is in line for a larger role in 2018. He’s apparently over a nagging disc issue in his back that had plagued him, and he started Seattle’s first two preseason games while routinely working with the No. 1 offense along with rookie Will Dissly because veteran Ed Dickson has been on the non-football injury list.

Dickson, a free-agent addition from Carolina, is the oldest of Seattle’s five tight ends at 31. But Vannett is the longest tenured in Seattle, and as such, he’s taken over for Willson as the overseer of the fines. That means he has the ultimate authority on what constitutes a fine, though he says he sometimes defers when he’s on the fence.
And it also means Vannett is in charge of keeping the running tally of who owes what. He estimates that he’s already in for around $2,000, which puts him in the middle of the pack, and that Dissly has contributed around $2,700 to top the list since the start of the offseason program in April.

Dissly’s total was inflated thanks to a hefty initiation fine.

Yep, a fine for getting drafted.

“When he first came in, since he was a fourth-round pick he got some signing bonus [$650,268 to be exact], and it happened to me when I first came in. We gave him a $1,000 initiation fine,” Vannett said. “So whenever somebody new comes in the room, you get an initiation fine, and depending on what your contract was [that determines the fine amount].”

What was Dissly’s reaction?

“He was kinda smiling it off,” Vannett said. “He didn’t know what to do. I mean, what can you do? If you complain about it, it’s another fine.”