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A breakdown of the Seattle Seahawks’ 2019 free-agent signings.

Akeem King, defensive back

The Seahawks re-signed Akeem King to a one-year deal worth $1.4 million on Friday, a source tells ESPN. Here’s a closer look at the defensive back who spent the past two seasons with Seattle.

What it means: Bringing back King is the first move by the Seahawks and it’s a notable one even though he’s an under-the-radar player. In addition to playing left and right cornerback, King has worked in the slot and at safety — a la DeShawn Shead. That versatility could come in handy given the state of Seattle’s secondary, which is about to say goodbye to Earl Thomas and also could lose nickelback Justin Coleman in free agency. King, a seventh-round pick by the Falcons in 2015, appeared in all 16 games last season while making one start and playing 145 defensive snaps, per Pro Football Reference. King, who will be 27 by the start of next season, was one of Seattle’s four restricted free agents along with tackle/tight end George Fant, defensive lineman Quinton Jefferson and fullback Tre Madden.

2019 Free Agency | Seahawks
What you need to know about the Seattle Seahawks:

» Seahawks’ free-agent signings
» Team needs: DL, LB, DB, EDGE
» Tracker: Latest moves around NFL
» Full top 100 free-agent rankingInsider
What’s the risk: There’s not much risk here. King’s one-year deal includes a $400,000 signing bonus, according to a source. He can make up to $2.05 million in all with incentives tied to playing time and interceptions. The max value of $2.05 million is slightly more than what King would have stood to make had the Seahawks given him the low RFA tender, which is worth a non-guaranteed $2.025 million. But if he makes the full amount, it means he became a significant contributor. And if not, the Seahawks will have paid him less than what they would have with the low tender. King is guaranteed more money on his deal than he would have been guaranteed on the tender. There’s more reward than risk for both sides.

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Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin has a Grade 2 partial MCL tear of the right knee, a source told ESPN’s Adam Schefter.

Baldwin went down in the first quarter of Seattle’s 27-24 loss against the Denver Broncos on Sunday and started limping off the field before he went down again and had to be tended to by the team’s medical staff. He eventually walked off on his own power and returned later in the first half, but was on the sideline in street clothes after halftime. Baldwin did not have a reception.

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Earl Thomas comes up big in Seahawks return
Safety Earl Thomas needed all of three practices and two defensive possessions to remind the Seahawks what they were missing, recording an interception and pass-breakup in the first quarter of Seattle’s loss to Denver on Sunday.

Coach Pete Carroll said on his radio show on KIRO-AM in Seattle on Monday that there was no update on how long Baldwin may be out.

“He was sore last night, but he was walking OK and all that,” Carroll said. “He wasn’t hampered in that regard. But he got hurt. He got hurt. There ain’t anybody tougher than him, and if he can come back, he’ll come back. That’s why he went back in the game. We were trying to talk him out of it and getting him to get him out of there. He made the right decision in not battling us.”

Baldwin, who has led Seattle in receiving in five of his seven NFL seasons, missed about a month of training camp with a left-knee injury. He estimated when he returned to practice in late August that he was 80 to 85 percent healthy and said his knee injury was something he would have to deal with throughout the season.

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RENTON, Wash. — If you’re a Seattle Seahawks tight end, you’d better not let anyone catch you reliving your high school glory days.

Or wearing your college team’s gear.

Or flaunting an expensive new purchase.

Those are just a few of the fineable offenses in the position group’s kangaroo court, a tradition that third-year tight end Nick Vannett is upholding following the free-agent departures of Jimmy Graham and Luke Willson. Vannett isn’t sure exactly when it started, just that it predates his arrival as a third-round pick in 2016 out of Ohio State.

“I’d say the most common one is probably a ‘Homeland’ fine,” Vannett said. “That’s the one we probably dish out the most. So for me, for example, if I were to wear anything Ohio, Ohio State, if I mention Ohio, any city in Ohio, I get fined for that.”

‘THAT’S A FINE’

A few examples of the fines doled out among the Seahawks’ tight ends, courtesy Nick Vannett:

Big Baller fine: “If you make like a big purchase or if you’re acting like you’re just a big baller, walking around like your s— don’t stink, then yeah [it’s a fine].”

Homeland fine: “That’s the one we probably dish out the most. So for me, for example, if I were to wear anything Ohio, Ohio State, if I mention Ohio, any city in Ohio, I get fined for that.”

Uncle Rico fine: “If you tell a high school story that we all just really don’t care about, that’s a fine.”

Sound effects fine: Vannett didn’t have much explanation other than to say their TE coach is a frequent violator.

No-fine fine: “If you go the whole day without getting a fine, you’re getting a fine.”

It’s $20 a pop — at least for now — with half the final pot helping fund an end-of-season tight ends trip and the other half earmarked for a to-be-determined charity. (“It usually goes towards something kid-related. In the past, we did it for cancer. So it’s always going towards a good cause,” Vannett said.)

It’s a good thing, then, that the fines are doled out liberally and no one in the room is above the law. Not even tight ends coach Pat McPherson.

“For Coach Pat, his big one is sound effects,” Vannett said. “He’s always making these sound effects like when we’re watching film. So 90 percent of his fines are from sound effects. We’ve got ‘Uncle Rico’ fines where if you tell a high school story that we all just really don’t care about, that’s a fine. There’s so many. We have a ‘No Fine’ fine. If you go the whole day without getting a fine, you’re getting a fine.”

The “Uncle Rico” fine is named for the character from “Napoleon Dynamite” who famously bragged that he could throw a pigskin a quarter mile back in his day and lamented that his high school team would’ve won state if only his coach had played him in the fourth quarter.

Said Vannett of McPherson: “We’ll watch film and something will click in his head and he’s like, ‘Oh, man, I remember this time at UCLA’ or whatever school he went to, like, ‘I did this in practice.’

“It’s like, ‘Pat, appreciate the story but that’s an Uncle Rico.'”

The tight ends aren’t the team’s only position group that has a fine system, but this one is definitely the wackiest.

“They’re kinda crazy,” said Frank Clark, who added that the defensive linemen will fine each other $500 whenever one of them costs another a sack.

Keeping things light is nothing new for Seattle’s tight ends. It was that group — Willson specifically — that spearheaded the Techno Thursday movement that by last season’s end had players bouncing up and down and pumping their fists while electronic dance music blared through the speakers in the locker room and the practice field.

It was a surprise when Vannett & Co. didn’t re-enact their club routine after he scored the Seahawks’ only offensive touchdown in their preseason opener.

It was a Thursday night, after all.

“Techno Thursday hasn’t really been the way I want it to be yet,” he said. “But … it’s still preseason, so we don’t want to show everything right now.”

After catching only 15 passes over his first two seasons while playing behind Graham and Willson, Vannett is in line for a larger role in 2018. He’s apparently over a nagging disc issue in his back that had plagued him, and he started Seattle’s first two preseason games while routinely working with the No. 1 offense along with rookie Will Dissly because veteran Ed Dickson has been on the non-football injury list.

Dickson, a free-agent addition from Carolina, is the oldest of Seattle’s five tight ends at 31. But Vannett is the longest tenured in Seattle, and as such, he’s taken over for Willson as the overseer of the fines. That means he has the ultimate authority on what constitutes a fine, though he says he sometimes defers when he’s on the fence.
And it also means Vannett is in charge of keeping the running tally of who owes what. He estimates that he’s already in for around $2,000, which puts him in the middle of the pack, and that Dissly has contributed around $2,700 to top the list since the start of the offseason program in April.

Dissly’s total was inflated thanks to a hefty initiation fine.

Yep, a fine for getting drafted.

“When he first came in, since he was a fourth-round pick he got some signing bonus [$650,268 to be exact], and it happened to me when I first came in. We gave him a $1,000 initiation fine,” Vannett said. “So whenever somebody new comes in the room, you get an initiation fine, and depending on what your contract was [that determines the fine amount].”

What was Dissly’s reaction?

“He was kinda smiling it off,” Vannett said. “He didn’t know what to do. I mean, what can you do? If you complain about it, it’s another fine.”